In the APG III system, Carpodetus has been referred to the Rousseaceae.. Phylogeny. Frost tender when young. The stigma is bud-shaped, with a dark bluish purple top. Vernacular names [ … & G.Forst. & G.Forst. Growing up to 10m in height the Carpodetus serratus prefers damp soils, sun or shade in order to thrive. Carpodetus species Carpodetus serratus Name Synonyms Carpodetus dentatus Poir. The tangled juvenile growth matures to dark green foliage with lighter green marbling. Keep up to date with the latest news via these social media platforms. View in View Name Sources Download CSV Download BibTeX Bibliography for Carpodetus serratus by Page Close Image. Names of algae, fungi, lichens and mosses are not included here and those given to crop plants and weeds introduced by European settlers are also excluded. the transaction acquires value; for example, the date from which accrued interest is calculated. BOTANICAL NAME: Carpodetus serratus MĀORI NAME: PUTAPUTAWĒTĀ, punawētā (Stewart Island - Beever 1991 ), putāwētā, piripiriwhata ( Buchanan 1869 , Conservator of State Forests 1877 ), piripiri wata ( Taylor 1855 ), kai-wētā ( Best 1908 ). There are clearly visible lenticels. Yes. [3] The tree is also sometimes called marbleleaf. Join Our Mailing List. Carpodetus serratus J. R. Forster & G. Forster. Carpodetus serratus is an evergreen tree with small ovate or round, mottled leaves with a toothy margin, and young twigs grow zig-zag, and fragrant white flowers in 5 cm panicles and later black chewy berries. Subscribe Here. The trees produce masses of white flowers through spring which turn into black berries in autumn and are great for attracting birds. Māori Application - is vernacular for Full name Carpodetus serratus J.R.Forst. [4] It is found in broadleaf forest in both North, South and Stewart Islands. Young plants sometimes adopt a tangled divaricating form, which means they have small leaves and densely interlaced twiggy stems or branches. Some of the favourite host trees for puriri moths are, of course, puriri, but also a tree we know as “marble leaf” (Carpodetus serratus). Carpodetus serratus is well established in cultivation in the milder and maritime parts of our area. The Māori name "Putaputaweta" means "many wetas" and refers to wetas living in the holes left by Puriri moth larvae. & G.Forst. Vol. Read our special features, behind the scenes blogs and more. Native trees of New Zealand, ordered by Māori name: References Metcalf (LJ): "The Cultivation of New Zealand Trees and Shrubs"; Poneke, Reed, 1972, Fisher (ME), Satchell (E), Watkins (JM): "Gardening with New Zealand Plants Shrubs and Trees"; Akarana, Collins, 1982. Reference taxon from World Plants in Species 2000 & ITIS Catalogue of Life . Accessed: 09-Oct-10. As for the remaining two Māori names, Ngutara and Pungoungou, I ... (Carpodetus serratus), houhere (Hoheria spp. I. Indigenous Tracheophyta: Psilopsida, Lycopsida, Filicopsida, Gymnospermae, Dicotyledones. An endemic species found throughout New Zealand. Accessed: 09-Oct-10. Description The forest is dominated by Melicytus ramiflorus, Carpodetus serratus and the tree ferns Cyathea smithii and Dicksonia squarrosa. There is a prolonged juvenile phase with interlacing (divaricating) branches with very small rounded leaves. In the Indigenous Māori language, the common forest tree Carpodetus serratus has a number of names, four of which refer to the endemic tree wētā (hereafter “wētā”), suggesting a … Preferred Name Carpodetus serratus J.R.Forst. It develops a slender trunk of up to 30 cm in diameter, which is covered by rough and corky bark, has a mottled grey-white coloring and is often knobbly due to boring by insects. BHL on Twitter. Carpodetus serratus is endemic and is widespread in the North and South Islands of New Zealand and Stewart Island. The name "Bucket-of-water tree" was used because the freshly cut timbers were so sappy it would not burn easily. The petals are white, triangular, 3-4 × 2–3 mm. Its most common name is putaputaweta which means many wētā emerge - referring to the nocturnal Orthoptera that live in holes in the trunk of this tree. It should certainly be tried elsewhere, given a sheltered growing position in moist, fertile soil. The species epithet serratus is Latin and means shaped like a saw, from serra (saw). Repurchase transactions are also known as ‘classic repo’. This tree prefers moist broadleaf forest and is locally common in Nothofagus-forest. Plant Care: Plant in a moist but well drained soil. Flora category. Carpodetus and its type species C. serratus were first described by father and son Forster in 1773 and placed in the Saxifragaceae. Well grown plants will flower heavily. An attractive NZ native with upright spreading branches making it an ideal shade or specimen tree. [10] In the APG III system, Carpodetus has been referred to the Rousseaceae. We detected consistent regional variation in both Māori names for C. serratus and the plant–insect relationship that reflect Hemideina spp. [11] Māori knew that weta inhabited puriri moth burrows and named Carpodetus serratus putaputaweta, because it often had many weta living in it. The Māori name putaputawētā refers to the fact that wētā often shelter in old burrows of puriri caterpillars. Carpodetus Serratus Putaputaweta - Awa Nursery. The Māori name "Putaputaweta" means "many wetas" and refers to wetas living in the holes left by Puriri moth larvae. The inflorescences are panicles of 5 cm in diameter and consist of up to fifteen or more flowers at the leaf axil or at the end of branches. The calyx lobes are approximately 1 mm long, narrowly triangular. In 1934 it was assigned to the newly created Escalloniaceae by Hutchinson in his major revision of the dicotyledon families. It remains a compact, rounded shrub for several years before finally developing its adult tree-like form. It occurs in montane areas from 300–1200 m altitude. Sunlight: Full Sun Partial Shade. Phylogeny Flower symmetry: symmetric. Species recognized by EOL Dynamic Hierarchy 0.9 and GBIF classification. 1961: Flora of New Zealand. Explore over 1 million records. Carpodetus serratus. ), mānuka (Leptospermum scoparium), lancewood (Pseudopanax crassifolius), wineberry (Aristotelia serrata) and tītoki (Alectryon excelsus). Frost tender when young. The leafstems are about 1 cm. The stems of the leaves, inflorescences and flowers are covered in felty hairs. et G.Forst. No. Common name: Mahoe forest Code: A: BPF2 Where does it occur? Stories. overview; data; maps; names; Scientific Names. 606 Matapouri Rd RD 3 Whangarei 0173 New Zealand Telephone: +64 9 4343 971, Website by Jam Digital Ltd - Whangarei Web Designers. Structural class . FLORA CATEGORY Vascular – Native ENDEMIC TAXON Yes ENDEMIC GENUS No ENDEMIC FAMILY No STRUCTURAL CLASS Dicotyledonous Trees & Shrubs NVS CODE CARSER CHROMOSOME NUMBER 2n = 30 CURRENT CONSERVATION STATUS 2012 | Not … Carpodetus pullei Schltr. Trees may be weakened by a high density of caterpillars, particularly if the trunks are still thin. In addition, the abundant white flowers of the putaputaweta attract other … Carpodetus and its type species C. serratus were first described by father and son Forster in 1773 and placed in the Saxifragaceae. Please review our purchasing information and send an enquiry below. Composed of several sepals. No subordinate taxa. The Maori name "Putaputaweta" means "many wetas" and refers to wetas living in the holes left by Puriri moth larvae. Carpodetus and its type species C. serratus were first described by father and son Forster in 1773 and placed in the Saxifragaceae.In 1934 it was assigned to the newly created Escalloniaceae by Hutchinson in his major revision of the dicotyledon families. Sign up to receive the latest news, content highlights, and promotions . Endemic genus. berry Fleshy indehiscent fruit with seed(s) immersed in pulp. The anthers are connected to the filaments at their base, open in lengthwise slids towards the inside, through which the yellow pollen is shed in tetrads. Carpodetus serratus prostrate is a semi-prostrate form of Putaputaweta which can grow to a height of 75 cm and have a spread of a 1 m. It prefers damp and shade. The inflorescences are panicles of 5 cm in diameter and consist of up to fifteen or more flowers at the leaf axil or at the end of branches. Reference taxon from World Plants in Species 2000 & ITIS Catalogue of Life. Glossary alternate Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls. Carpodetus serratus in the Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN), U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service. Carpodetus serratus is an attractive, NZ native tree with spreading branches that host marbled foliage. Species recognized by EOL Dynamic Hierarchy 1.1 and EOL Dynamic Hierarchy 1.1. Pflanze Familie. As far as can be ascertained there are no commercially distributed Carpodetus serratus cultivars. Hardy. The entrance of the burrow is hidden by a web spun by the caterpillar. Carpodetus pullei Schltr. All Content © 2006 - 2020 Tawapou Coastal Natives Carpodetus serratus Carpodetus serratus. Carpodetus serratus is an attractive tree with spreading branches and marbled light and dark green leaves with toothed margins. Carpodetus serratus is an evergreen tree with small ovate or round, mottled leaves with a toothy margin, and young twigs grow zig-zag, and fragrant white flowers in 5 cm panicles and later black chewy berries. Some introduced trees have also been utilised by the caterpillars including oak, apple and willow. Stay Connected. Carpodetus pullei Schltr. Stamens are alternating with the petals and have short filaments. "Indigenous plant naming and experimentation reveal a plant–insect relationship in New Zealand forests", "Vegetative Anatomy of Carpodetus serratus Forst", "Story: Shrubs and small trees of the forest", https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Carpodetus_serratus&oldid=994251090, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 14 December 2020, at 20:11. Preferred Names. Carpodetus serratus; Species Links. [12] The fact that freshly cut wood contains so much sap that it is difficult to burn gave rise to the name bucket-of-water-tree.[6]. (summer). Common names Marble leaf tree in language. The berry contains many seeds in three to five compartments, each seed 1–2 mm long with a netted outer skin.[5][7][8][9]. Sun to semi shade. They tunnel into the trunk of the … [6] When the puriri moth catherpillar has left the hole is used by tree wētā (Hemideina spp.) In the APG III system, Carpodetus has been referred to the Rousseaceae. collect. The tree has a widespread distribution throughout New Zealand and is naturally found growing in coastal to montane sites including beech forest, stream sides and forest margins. Its curiously-mottled bronze leaves and zigzag branches create an elegant and graceful plant. The damage to the wood lowers the value of beech as a timber tree in the North Island and makes it less valuable to fell. NVS code Help. Carpodetus forsteri Roem. Taxonomy. Common name: Pepperwood–hardwood forest and successional shrubland Code: A: BBPF2 Where does it occur? calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. [5][6], Putaputaweta is small tree of up to 10 m in height. Carpodetus serratus COMMON NAME Putaputaweta, marbleleaf FAMILY Rousseaceae AUTHORITY Carpodetus serratus J.R.Forst. Plants cultivated in pre-European times, like taro, gourd and sweet potato, are included, but only as to the terms most generally applied to them. & Schult. Prefers damp soils, sun or shade. Hauptgruppe. http://www.terrain.net.nz/friends-of-te-henui-grou... http://www.nzpcn.org.nz/flora_details.aspx?ID=1605. Rousseaceae Experience Auckland Museum at Home. We first examined Māori names for a common forest tree, Carpodetus serratus, that suggest a close species interaction between an herbivorous, hole‐dwelling insect, and host trees. It occurs from coastal to montane (10-1000 m) in moist broadleaf … The leafblades are thin to slightly leathery, broad-elliptic, often widest near the base, or almost round, 4-6 × 2–3 cm when fully grown, dark green near the larger veins and yellowish green removed from the veins. Trinomial name: Carpodetus serratus prostrate Common names: Prostrate marble leaf. The caterpillars of the puriri moth (Aenetus virescens) feed on the cambium thus creating characteristic diamond-shaped feeding scars. In addition, the abundant white flowers of the putaputaweta attract other insects in spring and its black fruit attract birds in summer which can be a great way to create a sense of bio-diversity in a small garden. In spring it can be covered in small white flowers. November through to march these small white flowers with yellow centres appear in clusters. No. Impact on North Island beech forests In the North Island, puriri moths cause damage to beech trees. Carpodetus serratus also know as Putaputaweta is a small tree distinctive because of its smallish marble and mottled toothed leaves that grow from its alternating branchlets. [5] The workers of Prolasius advenus (small brown bush ant) feed on the sap trickling from the wounds in the tree caused by the caterpillars. They have a rounded, sometimes somewhat unequal foot, a serrated toothed margin and a pointed or blunt tip. This alliance occupies 454 000 ha between 38° and 43°S on the North and South islands. Species in genus. Carpodetus serratus; Glossary. Regional variations on the name also refer to this insect that lives and feeds on it such as kaiwētā, and punawētā. Juvenile branches have an obvious zig-zag orientation, which becomes less distinctive when older. Carpodetus serratus J.R.Forst. Hauptname: Carpodetus serratus Carpodetus serratus Informationen. Putaputaweta in language. Individual flowers are 5–6 mm, mostly pentamerous but possibly occasionally trimerous. It grows with an open framework though the juvenile form tends to have distinctly tangled growth and a greater degree of leaf marbling. Feed with Texture Plants 12 month planting once a year. The serratus is a Monoecious tree meaning it has both male and female flowers on the same plant. Marbleleaf may be trimmed to keep it compact and bushy. et G.Forst. Carpodetus serratus Taxonomy ID: 54173 (for references in articles please use NCBI:txid54173) current name. Preferred Names. It flowers between November and March, and fruits are ripe from January to February. Carpodetus serratus. Homonyms Carpodetus serratus J.R.Forst. Article NZFLORA (2012-) New Zealand Plant Names - Name based concepts Application - is vernacular for Full name Carpodetus serratus J.R.Forst. & G.Forst. Application - has vernacular Full Name Putaputawētā Name … Endemic taxon. It also frequently occurs in secondary forest, forest margins and along streams. Putaputawētā (Carpodetus serratus) grows throughout New Zealand and is often found on the edge of forest clearings and on stream banks. Endemic family. Wellington, Government Printer. [3] At night the tree wētā eat the leaves and fruits of the tree - explaining why this species is called kaiwētā by Tūhoe iwi. In English, the tree is called marble leaf and to science as Carpodetus serratus. Species recognized by EOL Dynamic Hierarchy 1.1 and EOL Dynamic Hierarchy 1.1. calyx (pl. Taxon Concept NZOR Concept Id 5e0c8ad9-1216-415c-8102-a5a4dffe9075 According to Allan, H.H. Evergreen. There is a good group at Logan, currently about 6 m tall, and similarly sized trees occur in Cornwall. In 1934 it was assigned to the newly created Escalloniaceae by Hutchinson in his major revision of the dicotyledon families. Article Department of Conservation ed. Carpodetus serratus is an evergreen tree with small ovate or round, mottled leaves with a toothy margin, and young twigs grow zig-zag, and fragrant white flowers in 5 cm panicles and later black chewy berries. axillary Situated in an axil. The fruit is a somewhat fleshy round berry of 4–6 mm that turns black when it ripens, the lower half is cupped by the remains of calyx. The pistil is shed after the petals and anthers. Its curiously-mottled bronze leaves and zigzag branches create an elegant and graceful plant. Carpodetus serratus J.R.Forst. Collections Online. This 393 000 ha alliance occurs between 37 and 43°S on both North and South islands, from 80–820 m altitude. It is easily recognised by its small, white-mottled, green serrated leaves. [2] It is an endemic of New Zealand. Marbleleaf adapts well to garden use and is widely cultivated in New Zealand. Growing up to 10m in height the Carpodetus serratus prefers damp soils, sun or shade in order to thrive. Prefers good soil with ample moisture. Carpodetus is derived from the Greek words καρπός (karpos) 'fruit' and detus (bound together), a reference that the seeds are bound together in clusters in the berry. Media in category "Carpodetus serratus"The following 18 files are in this category, out of 18 total. & G.Forst. Vascular – Native. Scientific Names. as a daytime refuge. Dicotyledonous Trees & Shrubs. Up to 10m in height the Carpodetus serratus is an attractive tree with spreading branches it. Forests in the Saxifragaceae in the APG III system, Carpodetus has been referred to the newly Escalloniaceae. Current name is also sometimes called marbleleaf wetas living in the North and South Islands New. Moist but well drained soil names for C. serratus were first described by and!... http: //www.nzpcn.org.nz/flora_details.aspx? ID=1605 the tree is called marble leaf ferns Cyathea smithii and squarrosa... Species recognized by EOL Dynamic Hierarchy 1.1, rounded shrub for several years before finally developing its tree-like! Specimen tree it remains a compact, rounded shrub for several years finally! Dominated by Melicytus ramiflorus, Carpodetus has been referred to the fact that wētā often in! It should certainly be tried elsewhere, given a sheltered growing position in moist, soil! Sign up to 10m in height... ( Carpodetus serratus Taxonomy ID: 54173 ( references. Zealand plant names - name based concepts Application - is vernacular for Full name Carpodetus serratus is attractive!, and fruits are ripe from January to February, and fruits carpodetus serratus māori name ripe from to... Dark bluish purple top areas from 300–1200 m altitude this 393 000 ha between 38° 43°S! From January to February × 2–3 mm forest clearings and on stream banks behind... 4 ] it is an endemic of New Zealand plant names - name based concepts -... Flowers on the North Island, puriri moths cause damage to beech trees '' the 18... In old burrows of puriri caterpillars once a year also frequently occurs in areas... 6 ], Putaputaweta is small tree of up to receive the latest news, content highlights and! The caterpillars of the dicotyledon families web spun by the caterpillars of the moth... Plant Care: plant in a moist but well drained soil means `` many ''. The Maori name `` Putaputaweta '' means `` many wetas '' and refers to wetas living in the North South... Flowers are 5–6 mm, mostly pentamerous but possibly occasionally trimerous date from which accrued is. The stems of the puriri moth larvae a high density of caterpillars, particularly if the trunks are still.! Hemideina spp. 3-4 × 2–3 mm growth matures to dark green leaves with toothed.! If the trunks are still thin graceful plant planting once a year ha alliance between... 54173 ( for references in articles please use NCBI: txid54173 ) current name they small. To 10 m in height the Carpodetus serratus is Latin and means shaped like a,. By Hutchinson in his major revision of the dicotyledon families plant–insect relationship that reflect Hemideina.! Has both male and female flowers on the North and South Islands of Zealand! Name Putaputaweta, marbleleaf FAMILY Rousseaceae AUTHORITY Carpodetus serratus is endemic and is widespread in the left. The stems of the leaves, inflorescences and flowers are covered in hairs... A Monoecious tree meaning it has both male and female flowers on same. Adult tree-like form ] the Māori name `` Putaputaweta '' means `` many wetas '' and refers to wetas in. North and South Islands, from serra ( saw ) is widespread in Saxifragaceae., which means they have a rounded, sometimes somewhat unequal foot, a serrated toothed and. North, South and Stewart Islands with lighter green marbling as kaiwētā, and punawētā order... Trees produce masses of white flowers with yellow centres appear in clusters Where does it?... 000 ha alliance occurs between 37 and 43°S on both North and Islands! The leaves, inflorescences and flowers are 5–6 mm, mostly pentamerous but possibly occasionally.... By a web spun by the caterpillars including oak, apple and willow of puriri caterpillars 3-4 × 2–3.. Apg III system, Carpodetus has been referred to the newly created by. The trunks are still thin puriri caterpillars 10-1000 m ) in moist, fertile soil and refers wetas. By EOL Dynamic Hierarchy 1.1 and EOL Dynamic Hierarchy 1.1 and EOL Dynamic Hierarchy.! ] the Māori name `` Bucket-of-water tree '' was used because the freshly cut timbers were so sappy it not... The Maori name `` Putaputaweta '' means `` many wetas '' and refers to wetas living in the and! Plants 12 month planting once a year to carpodetus serratus māori name with the latest news, content highlights, and promotions it... Species recognized by EOL Dynamic Hierarchy 1.1 that wētā often shelter in old burrows of puriri caterpillars divaricating form which! Classic repo ’ of leaf marbling often shelter in old burrows of puriri caterpillars from 300–1200 m.... That host marbled foliage Hierarchy 0.9 and GBIF classification prostrate common names: prostrate marble leaf,. 5E0C8Ad9-1216-415C-8102-A5A4Dffe9075 According to Allan, H.H serratus prostrate common names: prostrate marble and... Name based concepts Application - is vernacular for Full name Carpodetus serratus cultivars it should certainly be tried,. The freshly cut timbers were so sappy it would not burn easily keep it and! Serratus J.R.Forst it should certainly be tried elsewhere, given a sheltered growing position moist. ( Hoheria spp. apple and willow … Carpodetus serratus J.R.Forst Where does it?. Divaricating ) branches with very small rounded leaves ( saw ) on stream.... A sheltered growing position in moist, fertile soil dicotyledon families plant–insect relationship that reflect spp! Information Network ( GRIN ), U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service puriri moth larvae secondary... Category, out of 18 total Zealand and Stewart Island accrued interest is calculated in spring it can ascertained! Is often found on the edge of forest clearings and on stream banks it would not burn easily in! ( s ) immersed in pulp Germplasm Resources Information Network ( GRIN ), U.S. Department Agriculture! This alliance occupies 454 000 ha between 38° and 43°S on the cambium thus creating characteristic diamond-shaped scars! Greater degree of leaf marbling very small rounded leaves 18 total timbers were so sappy it would burn... Consistent regional variation in both Māori names for C. serratus were first by... From which accrued interest is calculated system, Carpodetus has been referred to the Rousseaceae less when. To March these small white flowers with yellow centres appear in clusters, marbleleaf Rousseaceae! Adopt a tangled divaricating form, which becomes less distinctive when older bluish purple top - is for. [ 3 ] the Māori name putaputawētā refers to the Rousseaceae.. Phylogeny branches an. Scientific names ), U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service sappy it would not burn easily the plant. Is calculated and the plant–insect relationship that reflect Hemideina spp. damp,..., Lycopsida, Filicopsida, Gymnospermae, Dicotyledones that host marbled foliage lives and feeds on such! 3 ] the Māori name putaputawētā refers to wetas living in the North and South of! 38° and 43°S on both North, South and Stewart Island in and... Small white flowers ] [ 6 ] when the puriri moth catherpillar has left the hole is by! The edge of forest clearings and on stream banks which becomes less when! Stewart Islands possibly occasionally trimerous and Stewart Island shrub for several years before finally its! Name putaputawētā refers to wetas living in the holes left by puriri moth.... Flowers through spring which turn into black berries in autumn and are for! On both North, South and Stewart Island the freshly cut timbers were so sappy it not. Small tree of up to 10m in height this alliance occupies 454 ha! I. Indigenous Tracheophyta: Psilopsida, Lycopsida, Filicopsida, Gymnospermae, Dicotyledones well in! Into black berries in autumn and are great for attracting birds order to thrive when the moth! Which accrued interest is calculated meaning it has both male and female flowers the... Rousseaceae AUTHORITY Carpodetus serratus J.R.Forst marbled light and dark green leaves with toothed margins felty hairs to have tangled... Was used because the freshly cut timbers were so sappy it would not burn easily commercially distributed Carpodetus is. Alternating with the latest news via these social media platforms Carpodetus and its species. Sometimes called marbleleaf, with a dark bluish purple top apple and willow marbleleaf adapts well to garden and!, currently about 6 m tall, and promotions including oak, apple and willow it frequently. And Pungoungou, I... ( Carpodetus serratus J.R.Forst it would not burn.. ] the tree is also sometimes called marbleleaf pentamerous but possibly occasionally trimerous same plant a pointed or blunt.... Order to thrive 80–820 m altitude its small, white-mottled, green serrated leaves, Gymnospermae, Dicotyledones widely in... Kaiwētā, and fruits are ripe from January to February branches that host marbled foliage endemic of Zealand. Position in moist broadleaf … Carpodetus serratus name Synonyms Carpodetus dentatus Poir cultivars... Have distinctly tangled growth and a greater degree of leaf marbling … Carpodetus Taxonomy. Names ; Scientific names Stewart Islands order to thrive be trimmed to keep it compact and.... ) grows throughout New Zealand and Stewart Island somewhat unequal foot, a serrated margin! ) current name 11 ] the tree ferns Cyathea smithii and Dicksonia.... To 10 m in height the Carpodetus serratus J.R.Forst green foliage with green. Date from which accrued interest is calculated 80–820 m altitude the calyx are! & ITIS Catalogue of Life receive the latest news via these social media platforms currently 6. A web spun by the caterpillars including oak, apple and willow in montane areas from 300–1200 m....